Rithmio recognizes your every gesture — and now has $3 million in the pocket
Jul02

Rithmio recognizes your every gesture — and now has $3 million in the pocket

On its own, the average activity tracker can be pretty inaccurate when it comes to determining a user’s gestures. But a gesture recognition software from Chicago-based Rithmio can make these kinds of gadgets far more precise. The potential for Rithmio’s platform is so great that the company just closed a $3 million seed round of financing co-led by KGC Capital and Intel Capital. With the raise, Rithmio intends to solidify key partnerships in the wearables space to achieve its goal of becoming the world’s leading gesture recognition platform. “Activity tracking is incomplete today,” Rithmio CEO Adam Tilton tells Wearables.com. “The device is restricted to one limb and activities tracked are a mere fraction of how a person moves in a day. Wearables will quickly evolve past the device into multiple devices working in unison to track how the entire body moves.” The company opened sign ups for its SDK this week and is hopeful that developers and product teams at startups and stalwarts alike will come calling. As Tilton puts it, what Rithmio can do goes far being using motion data for fitness use cases. You might also like: Rithmio’s CEO explains the issues behind today’s activity trackers “Today a physical therapist shows a patient how to do a rehabilitation exercise in the office and gets very little insight on how well or whether at all a patient performs the exercise at home,” he says. “We can solve this problem and make an impact on outpatient care with our technology.” Intel Capital’s investment in Rithmio is one of many recent strategic moves including Recon Instruments, Thalmic Labs, and Basis. Earlier this year at CES, Intel also announced a button-sized system on chip called Intel Curie that’s anticipated to be released in late 2015. “Intel is exploring a wide range of potential applications for wearable tech and gesture recognition,” said Steven Holmes, vice president of the New Devices Group and general manager of the Smart Device Innovation team at Intel. “We look forward to working with Rithmio as they push the boundaries of their...

Read More
Huawei announces a budget smartwatch boasting “minimalistic” design
Jul01

Huawei announces a budget smartwatch boasting “minimalistic” design

Huawei fans were hit in the gut when the company revealed production was far behind schedule on the Huawei Watch. Originally slated for release in March 2015, the launch date was pushed back to September or October of 2015. But to tide Android smartwatch fanatics over is the announcement of the Huawei Honor Band Zero. So far only renderings are available, which show a design that Huawei itself calls “minimalistic” and Scandinavian-inspired. Read more: 12 reasons why the Huawei smartwatch rules Judging by the circular face of the device, its likely that the smartwatch will tell time and track some range of basic activities. Remember, though, that Honor is Huawei’s budget-conscious line of products, so the watch can only get so many and still remain affordable. Even so, with basic water resistance, a light sensor, activity tracking capabilities, and a sleek design, the Band Zero looks like a low-end option to look forward to. We’ll let you know more information as it...

Read More
Wearables community review: What the Apple Watch giveaway winners say
Jun24

Wearables community review: What the Apple Watch giveaway winners say

Enough months have passed since the highly anticipated debut of the Apple Watch that the device is now available for in-store purchase (a June date that seemed forever away when pre-orders went live back in April). Similarly marking the passage of time, most self-appointed tech experts have gone on the record expressing their disdain for, in more cases, love of the Apple smartwatch. But at Wearables.com, we’re especially interested in what our community of wearables consumers has to say about the experience he or she has the wearable technology we’re so passionate about. Much to our delight, the two winners of our May 2015 Apple Watch giveaway dutifully — and excitedly, might we add — came pouring forth with feedback on the device, and their ratings of their experiences living with it are below. Apple, you might want to pay good and close attention to what Jackie Zhang and Jade Taylor have to say in the following Apple Watch review.   Battery Life: 4* (*note, all scores are averages of the two users’ ratings) Jackie Zhang: Jackie reported an average of 16 hours when it came to battery life — a comparatively small amount (when compared to, say, Pebble) that didn’t seem to bother him. “The battery life was overall great. One charge is definitely enough to last a day. . .In about 1-1.5 hours you should be able to get a full charge. For the colors and screen resolution, it is definitely good for the battery life!” Jade Taylor: Jade also heavily used the watch and was pleased with the length of charge, unable to discern any ill effects on her smartphone’s battery life. “The battery life was way better than expected, especially after know that several sensors were always on in order to check if the watch is even being worn… I also tried many other watch faces, like all the motion watch faces. I was expecting the animation to dramatically decrease the battery life but I still ended with 50 percent at 10pm. I would compare this to the Samsung Gear Live and the Motorola Moto 360.” Comfort: 5 JZ: Jackie noted the great fit as far as length of watch band goes, furthering, “The watch is extremely light, when put on wrist, one can barely feel it over time. After charging, it does release a tiny bit of warmth but it is not enough for it to be a bother. Because the length of the wrist is perfect dimensions for me, it fit perfectly.” JT: “The sport band is one of the most comfortable and creepiest-feeling things I’ve worn. Ever,” Jade hilariously explains. “It’s made out...

Read More
Apple Watch finally available in-store, rumors of Apple Watch 2 abound
Jun19

Apple Watch finally available in-store, rumors of Apple Watch 2 abound

Even if you weren’t seeking the information out, you most likely caught wind of Friday’s big announcement: Apple Watches are now available for in-store purchase. The long wait is chalked up to Apple’s retail head, according to the Wall Street Journal, who “told store employees in a memo before the watch’s release that the online-only approach would work better to give customers the models they wanted earlier and faster.” Of course, now everyone is mostly concerned with the second generation Apple Watch, thanks to a report from 9to5Mac which stated the following: The new FaceTime camera will reportedly be built into the Apple Watch’s top bezel and enable users to make and receive FaceTime calls on their wrists. Apple previously announced at WWDC that WatchOS 2 will have a new FaceTime Audio feature for Wi-Fi-based calling, and the new software also enables Apple Watch users to answer or reject FaceTime video calls through a paired iPhone.   A new Wi-Fi chip inside the Apple Watch 2 will expand the wrist-worn device’s iPhone-free Wi-Fi capabilities for basic tasks, possibly including text messaging, emailing and up-to-date weather data. The new wireless chipset will also enable Find my Watch for tracking a lost, stolen or misplaced Apple Watch using Wi-Fi router triangulation technology as opposed to GPS. So, to get the first-ever Apple Watch or wait it out? Eh, who knows how long it will take to hit the marketplace. Take the...

Read More
Fitbit stock soars well above expectations, landing among top 10 market debuts this year
Jun18

Fitbit stock soars well above expectations, landing among top 10 market debuts this year

Fitbit landed among the top 10 stock market debuts of the year Thursday morning when shares opened 52 percent above their $20 IPO offer price. The price per share soared to $30.40. “I feel a lot of gratitude for everyone who has been on the journey with us, all the employees, the investors who have struggled with us over the years, and our customers, as well,” Fitbit CEO James Park told CNBC from the NYSE trading floor. “There’s over 200 billion dollars of consumer spending on health and fitness every year. This is a massive market; there’s room for more than one dominant player,” Park continued, citing Fitbit’s wide range of products (but mostly activity trackers) as a competitive differentiator. Available devices include the Fitbit Surge, FitbitCharge, FitbitCharge HR, Fitbit Flex, Fitbit Zip, Fitbit One, and the Aria Wi-Fi Smart Scale. At $20 a share, Fitbit is valued at $4.1 billion. At its opening price of $30.40 a share, it’s valued at $6.2 billion — making Fitbit one of the most valuable consumer technologies in the world. According to its IPO filing in May, Fitbit took in $745.4 million in revenue in 2014 and $131.8 million in net income. Sales dramatically jumped from 2013, when the company reported $271 million in revenue and a $52 million net loss. Fitbit’s devices alone accounted for 68 percent of the activity tracker market in 2014. “We’re more than just wearables,” Park continued Thursday morning. “We’re going to be focusing a lot on software and services. So again, the mission of the company is really to get people healthier and more active.” Oh, and when asked about legal nemesis Jawbone? “We really respect all of our competitors,” is all Park had to say.  At the writing of this article, over 41 million shares were being traded Stay tuned for more...

Read More