Six smartwatches to watch in the second half of 2015, from Samsung Gear S2 to Tag Heuer Carrera 01
Aug26

Six smartwatches to watch in the second half of 2015, from Samsung Gear S2 to Tag Heuer Carrera 01

With continuous improvements to sensory and PFOE technology (print, flexible, and organic electronics), the wearable tech market is expected to rise all the way through 2018. Now that the first half of 2015 has come and gone, we took a look at some of the most anticipated smartwatches being released before year’s end. From incredible second generation models to surprising first time players in the smartwatch game, we gathered six of the most discussed upcoming smartwatches on the web today. Some will be out by the end of summer, but all of them will be here by Christmas. Let’s hope you’ve been good this year. Samsung Gear S2 (Orbis) Samsung is expected to introduce a highly anticipated new edition to the Gear family. On August 12, the Samsung Gear S2 (code named Orbis) was announced as the first circular interfaced smartwatch that the company has created. It will feature 360×360 resolution, 4 GB of data storage, and use AMOLED technology. Rumors have suggested that the new watch will cost more than the Samsung Gear S, which would put it above $350. Asus ZenWatch 2 When the Asus ZenWatch was released last year, it seemed like another knock-off smartwatch at first glance but quickly became a top performing device. The second generation is expected to be released later in 2015 and focuses on customization. The Asus ZenWatch 2 will have two sizes, three colors, and 18 different straps to showcase your unique personality. It will maintain a digital crown, metal charger, and the standard water resistant feature. The watch will come equipped with curved Gorilla Glass and AMOLED technology. Moto 360 2 The Moto 360 may have been one of the most aesthetically desirable watches in 2014, but the hardware wasn’t. The Motorola second generation could move past that hiccup with the implementation of an upgraded Snapdragon Processor and a 360×360 resolution. The Moto 360 2 is expected to gyroscope, barometer, accelerometer, and a heart rate monitor. The new watch is expected to work along with the first generation Moto 360, rather than replace it. Motorola said it will hold a press conference at IFA on September 2nd. Tag Heuer Carrera 01 Swiss watch designer Tag Heuer is jumping into the wearable tech arena with its first-ever luxury smartwatch. The information on this product is a closely kept secret, but we can report that Tag Heuer is working with Intel and Google on the watch. It will be built to last a lifetime, which would be the first for any smartwatch, and the first to have upgradable parts. The smartwatch is expected to be priced at $1,400 and available this October. Breitling B55 Connected Breitling is...

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The best golf wearables to improve your game and swing
Aug20

The best golf wearables to improve your game and swing

Despite what you may think, golf isn’t your dad’s sport anymore. With wearable technology breaking into many facets of our lives, it was only a matter of time before we found a way to quantify our golfing performance. Smartwatch and sensory technology have come a long way in helping golfers hone their skills, even despite their level of experience. Do you need a little help with distance or keep getting the ball stuck in a sandpit? Fear no more because we took a look at wearables for your wrist, hands, and even your back that will help you get the best golf swing. The best golf watches, GPS golf devices, and swing analyzers GameGolf The Game Golf Classic is revolutionizing the way you play golf. This unique wearable has small sensors that plug into the end of your grips and another sensor on your belt that records data from your round. This device is completely independent and doesn’t bluetooth to a smartphone. Instead, users will upload their data to a computer, where users will be able to view data on automatic game tracking, shot detection, club performance, and shot dispersion, just to name a few. Users will be able to get their best golf swing down with a little help from this wearable (which is available for $199). Garmin Approach S6 The running joke is that this watch will do everything your caddy does, and for $399 bucks, it better. The Garmin Approach S6 is the sixth generation device to come out from the company that basically marketed GPS tech to the masses. Golfing enthusiast website Critical Golf  gave the smartwatch and astounding score of 95 out of 100, and for good reason. The Garmin golf GPS watch comes with a top of the line tracker and overhead map display, all tucked under a touchscreen. It has built in scoring and statistic tracking to make this one of the top performing golf watches on the market today. Zepp Golf Sensor Golfing is intended to be a relaxing sport, but if you’re trying to step up your game, it can be frustrating when you aren’t seeing results. Zepp recently put out a relatively affordable ($149) new golfing wearable that is designed to improve your performance with real time data tracking — without having to wear a bulky GPS golf watch. The golfer’s swing device is a tracker that you attach to your glove and monitors your club speed, hip rotation, swing plane, tempo, and back swing position. The data is fed to an app on your smartphone that creates a visual representation of your performance. The data can even come together to give...

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The best wearables for a water workout, from swimming watches to swimming headphones
Aug18

The best wearables for a water workout, from swimming watches to swimming headphones

The dog days of summer are in full swing, and with scorching temperatures on the rise, a dip in a pool or a swim in the ocean sounds downright appealing. Whether you’re a rugged survivalist or just want some casual wearable tech that will survive a rainy day, getting a waterproof device is a solid investment.   We’ve gone through the best devices for navigating the day, finding out where you’re going, and keeping an eye on the heart, but what about when you just need to jump in for a swim to get that workout done? We f0und the seven best swimming wearables to cool off with — and the findings are pretty affordable. Swimovate PoolMate HR If your workout is primarily water-based, then the PoolMate HR by Swimovate is the perfect accessory. This swimming device allows you to monitor your heart rate in and out of the pool, automatically track and record each stroke and lap you make, and set alarms to help you beat a personal best. The wearable comes with software for your computer that can help you track your progress. With its understated design, this device looks just as good as casual accessory as it does being a workout enhancer. You can order the swimming watch online for around $175. Instabeat A heads-up display for swimming might seem a little far fetched, but that’s actually not the case. Instabeat has developed a swimming wearable that you can attach onto swimming goggles so you can optimize your performance. The display is pretty rudimentary, but that’s important since you need to be focused on your workout. The attachment monitors your heart rhythm, calorie counter, and breathing patterns. The built in sensors also track your strokes, laps, and flip-turns. The wearable is priced at $140, but you are going to have to keep an eye on this one. They seem to seem to sell out pretty quickly. Finis Neptune V2 Bone conductor technology became widely popularized when Google Glass was introduced in 2013. Since then, the application of this technology is astounding. The Neptune V2 by Finis implements this technology so you can experience one of the best underwater MP3 players out there today. With 4 GB of data storage, waterbabies can use these swimming headphones to listen to music, podcasts, and audiobooks without having pesky earbuds pop out of their ears. The lithium ion battery lasts up to eight hours on a single charge. Considering all the things that the Neptune V2 can do, its price of $159.99 is pretty reasonable. Sony Walkman Sport MP3 Player The Walkman is still a thing. This device, however, can actually be pretty beneficial to those that...

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Can the Microsoft Hololens avoid the fate of Google Glass?
Aug17

Can the Microsoft Hololens avoid the fate of Google Glass?

It’s becoming difficult to remember what year it is. There’s a presidential race featuring Bush and Clinton, a new Star Wars movie due out this year, and even a supposedly functional hover-board. Soon we can expect to see some serious tech that will question our sense of reality. Microsoft Hololens, an “untethered, see-through holographic computer,” will debut sometime in 2016 — and many draw comparisons to Google Glass when discussing the forthcoming headset. But it begs the question, will the two devices share the same fate? A breakthrough… almost Google Glass was supposed to be the hallmark for the wearables industry. Back in early 2013, the ground-breaking technology was roughly in the phase that the current Hololens is in today. Journalists wrote with bewilderment as consumers began to grow hungry with anticipation for a final Glass product. However, when you stop to think about it, the hype around Google Glass made sense. It was a mysterious product of the future that only a select group of people could use. The wearable came loaded with incredible features, like a five megapixel camera that also recorded video at 720p. But by May of 2014, the headset went on sale for consumers and we quickly realized the obvious: We didn’t need it. Consumer reaction What we got was a glorified smartphone strapped to your head at a hefty price tag. More importantly, it didn’t solve any problems. Ian Altman published an article on Forbes discussing the major flaws that plagued Glass. The biggest issue was that the product didn’t resolve any sort of problem or inconvenience for consumers that a smartphone couldn’t already do. Consumers were not about to shell out $1,500 bucks for a product that they didn’t understand or necessarily require, and public concern over privacy worked against the device. Plus the whole “glasshole” thing really put a damper on Google’s release. Read More: Oculus, Sony, and Microsoft race to create the best virtual reality experiences at E3 Instead of riding out the initial public reaction to the Glass, Google did something unexpected. Earlier this year, Google pulled the plug on their product and hasn’t been particularly vocal about the future of the device. Rumors suggest that the next iteration of Google Glass will be focused on professionals even though Google has made no announcement. The fate of the Hololens So will the Hololens similarly crumble after it’s released? Probably not. Holistically, the products are completely different, serve different functions, and have been marketed to different target audiences. The Microsoft device implements unparalleled augmented reality technology, unlike Google Glass that simply displayed information from your smartphone. The Hololens creates a completely different experience through deep immersion so that the user can heavily interact...

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Android Experiments website showcases open source apps for Android devices
Aug12

Android Experiments website showcases open source apps for Android devices

Google recently unveiled a new website showcasing experimental applications designed for Android and Android Wear powered devices. Titled Android Experiments, the website could have the potential to take emerging apps in a new direction. So far the website has around 20 apps that are being showcased and is expected to add to that. According to Techcrunch, the developers will be using current tools like the Android SDK and NDK,Android Wear, the IOIO board, Cinder, Processing, OpenFrameworks and Unity. Innovation in the app development world is going to be strongly dependent on the open source requirement that Google has on the developing apps. Google expressed the difficulty in app creation and how open source development can change how we perceive the functionality of apps. “Each project challenges in small and big ways how we think of the devices we interact with every day,” wrote Google design advocate Roman Nurik and Google Creative Lab member Richard The. One of featured apps in the Android Experiments page is Inkspace by Zach Lieberman. According to Lieberman, you can draw on your device, move the phone by tilting in different directions, adjust line that you are drawing, create an animated line which pulses and re-draws itself and record an animated gif of whatever you make. What you draw is then transformed into an animated 3-D picture. Designed by Anthony Tripoldi, Landmark is another frontrunner open sourced application on the website.The app uses your device sensors, coupled with GPS and the Google Places API to show you the world around you in a completely new way. This isn’t the first time that google has put open source information on a website before. In 2009, the tech company showcased Chrome Experiments, a website dedicated to open source chrome extensions. Chrome quickly became one of the leading browsers around and some have credited the experiments portion to its success. If Android Experiments provides anything to the users, it is innovation across platforms. The developers have a chance to work on each others’ applications and perfect the user experience. That could have a cascading effect that up-and-coming developers can use on other devices (looking at you,...

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