Michigan State goes to Final Four, we revisit Coach Izzo’s stress study
Apr03

Michigan State goes to Final Four, we revisit Coach Izzo’s stress study

As the Michigan State Spartans meet Duke in the Final Four on Saturday, April 4. we revisited last year’s rather, er, comprehensive study conducted by ESPN Sports Science. During a game against Illinois, ESPN had Michigan State coach Tom Izzo wear a bioharness and accelerometer — and even swallow a sensor to track core body temperature (meaning it had to be retrieved somehow…). What the data revealed was that the then 59-year-old was in pretty great shape. Izzo began with a resting respiratory rate of 14 breaths per minute, and a heartbeat of 68 beats per minute. Within a quick nine minutes, Izzo roughly doubled his breath and heart rate. However, he tempered the stress and corresponding adrenaline release by moving nearly constantly. On the side of the court, he’d walked 1.8 miles by the end of the game. Izzo’s core body temperature peaked at 100 degrees, his heart pumping 135 beats per minute. One stat that surprised even Izzo: he stayed at 70 percent of his max heart rate the entire game, which is the same percentage a marathon runner maintains over the course of 26.2 miles. Even so, the coach was able to recover to “normal levels” within 30 seconds of each peak, evidencing his excellent conditioning. See the full video of the study...

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NBA team adopts Athos’ smart fitness clothing for amplified workouts
Mar23

NBA team adopts Athos’ smart fitness clothing for amplified workouts

How did Athos become a groundbreaking tech startup? Much less, one known for creating the first-ever smart clothing, which tracks muscle effort and activity, and then sends that data to a smartphone app? “Naive confidence,” says Athos CEO Dhanaja Jayalath. “We just believed that we could do it.” To create a proprietary sensor that is sweat-proof and waterproof, Jayalath and his team had to “start from scratch” multiple times. Jayalath joked that he often felt like “a glorified seamstress.” “I got my degree in electrical engineering and have spent quite a few of the last months figuring out how to sew all these sensors into pants.” The results were ultimately worth the time-intensive work, as Athos has now received a total of $15.7 million in venture capital and angel funding.   One of the company’s investors is Golden State Warriors majority owner and chairman, Joe Lacob, and partial owner Chamath Palihapitiya also serves as Athos’ executive chairman and co-founder. A true partnership, the professional basketball team practices wearing Athos. The San Francisco Business Times reported that the NBA team has been beta-testing Athos’ smart shirts and pants in preparation for the official launch of Athos’ clothing this week. Palihapitiya told the Business Times, “We see these products as a more precise way to train athletes, allowing them to be more efficient and see fatigue before injury occurs.” According to Palihapitiya, Athos is marketing their smart clothing to professional athletes and regular gym-goers alike. Up to 50 million people go to the gym at least four times a week, and they too could get use out of Athos’ progress-tracking capabilities. Athos is selling their plastic “core” for $199, and the smart shirt and smart pants will be $99 each. Apparently, the pre-sale has been going well — the company says it’s sold “multi-millions of dollars” worth...

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