The best golf wearables to improve your game and swing
Aug20

The best golf wearables to improve your game and swing

Despite what you may think, golf isn’t your dad’s sport anymore. With wearable technology breaking into many facets of our lives, it was only a matter of time before we found a way to quantify our golfing performance. Smartwatch and sensory technology have come a long way in helping golfers hone their skills, even despite their level of experience. Do you need a little help with distance or keep getting the ball stuck in a sandpit? Fear no more because we took a look at wearables for your wrist, hands, and even your back that will help you get the best golf swing. The best golf watches, GPS golf devices, and swing analyzers GameGolf The Game Golf Classic is revolutionizing the way you play golf. This unique wearable has small sensors that plug into the end of your grips and another sensor on your belt that records data from your round. This device is completely independent and doesn’t bluetooth to a smartphone. Instead, users will upload their data to a computer, where users will be able to view data on automatic game tracking, shot detection, club performance, and shot dispersion, just to name a few. Users will be able to get their best golf swing down with a little help from this wearable (which is available for $199). Garmin Approach S6 The running joke is that this watch will do everything your caddy does, and for $399 bucks, it better. The Garmin Approach S6 is the sixth generation device to come out from the company that basically marketed GPS tech to the masses. Golfing enthusiast website Critical Golf  gave the smartwatch and astounding score of 95 out of 100, and for good reason. The Garmin golf GPS watch comes with a top of the line tracker and overhead map display, all tucked under a touchscreen. It has built in scoring and statistic tracking to make this one of the top performing golf watches on the market today. Zepp Golf Sensor Golfing is intended to be a relaxing sport, but if you’re trying to step up your game, it can be frustrating when you aren’t seeing results. Zepp recently put out a relatively affordable ($149) new golfing wearable that is designed to improve your performance with real time data tracking — without having to wear a bulky GPS golf watch. The golfer’s swing device is a tracker that you attach to your glove and monitors your club speed, hip rotation, swing plane, tempo, and back swing position. The data is fed to an app on your smartphone that creates a visual representation of your performance. The data can even come together to give...

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Garmin’s new cycling products could save your life
Jul02

Garmin’s new cycling products could save your life

While cyclists may have been left in the dust as of late with announcements surroundings Google’s first self-driving car and other car-related innovations, Garmin has reaffirmed its dedication to those on two wheels. The company’s newest cycling accessory line, Varia, is set to include a variety of technology to keep you connected to your bike. The Garmin Varia Smart Bike Light will pair with the Garmin Edge 1000 cycling computer to adjust the brightness and depth of your headlight according to your speed. When you’ve slowed down to navigate tricky paths, the beam will stay in close. As you fly down smooth pavement, the beam will reach further in front of you for better visualization. With a smart light in the front, your tail light will also be equipped to flash faster so drivers will know when you are braking. Also introduced to keep cyclists aware of their surroundings was the Varia Rearview Bike Radar. This invaluable piece tech scans for traffic behind the rider, displaying up to eight vehicles on an Edge 1000 screen. To take training regimes to the next level, Garmin also reveled its partnership with Strava. To conjure up healthy competition, the Garmin Edge 520 will feature Strava Live Segments which allow runners and cyclists to compare their personal times to Garmin’s database of statistics. Users can pick a variety of segments to sync with their device and will be able to view leaderboards and data in order to break records, keep up pacing, and push personal limits. Strava chief product officer Aaron Forth hopes to “motivate athletes,” saying “[Strava has] learned that making it easy to compare and compete is a powerful tool for motivation.” The Edge 520 is up for pre-sale on the Strava website and will be making its debut with Live Segments at the Tour de France with Team Cannondale-Garmin. Although this integration is really cool, you’ll have to become a Strava Premium member in order to access the Live Segments for about $59 a...

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Wearables market shows huge increase, Apple Watch will be measuring stick
Jun04

Wearables market shows huge increase, Apple Watch will be measuring stick

Good news for wearables companies worldwide: Market trends demonstrate a growing interest in and opportunity for the wearable tech industry. In a report published on Wednesday, the International Data Corporation (IDC) revealed that vendors shipped a total of 11.4 million wearable devices in the first quarter of 2015 — a staggering number when compared to the 3.8 million wearable devices shipped in the first quarter of 2014. That’s an impressive 200 percent increase. IDC Research manager Ramon Llamas says that bucking the post-holiday decline usually associated with the first quarter of the year is a strong indicator for the wearables market’s future success. “It demonstrates growing end-user interest and the vendors’ ability to deliver a diversity of devices and experiences,” he writes. “In addition, demand from emerging markets is on the rise and vendors are eager to meet these new opportunities.” Now that the Apple Watch is on the market and available for in-store purchase in the United States in just two weeks, IDC anticipates its presence will become a sort of market barometer. “The Apple Watch will likely become the device that other wearables will be measured against, fairly or not,” Llamas said. “This will force the competition to up their game in order to stay on the leading edge of the market.” The Apple Watch is soon to get into the hands of more consumers when it becomes available for in-store purchase in seven additional countries (Italy, Mexico, Singapore, South Korea, Spain, Switzerland and Taiwan) on June 26. IDC’s findings support the entrance into emerging markets, stating, “[D]emand [for wearables] from emerging markets is on the rise and vendors are eager to meet these new opportunities.” IDC ranked the top first quarter wearables vendors as (in descending order) Fitbit, Xiaomi, Garmin, Samsung, and Jawbone, with the currently feuding Jawbone and Fitbit showing the strongest year-over-year...

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Garmin’s new Forerunner 225 ups the ante with optical heart rate
May14

Garmin’s new Forerunner 225 ups the ante with optical heart rate

It was only a matter of time before GPS kingpin Garmin released a watch that can do more than count and track steps, behave as an accelerometer, and have an almost disturbing capability to accurately gauge and predict the wearers’ fitness capacity. Now, these features can be coupled with the ability to measure heart rate from the wrist. Dropped on Thursday, the Forerunner 225 is a colorful and good-looking alternative to traditional heart-rate monitors and similar products, ringing in at $299. Developed with Mio’s Heart Rate Monitor, an optical sensor in the watch shines LED light and uses advanced technology to filter light back in, effectively measuring heartbeats per minute in real time. To make the resulting number instantaneously relevant to the wearer, a colorful display delegates “zones” corresponding to heart rate: gray for the warm-up zone, blue for easy, green for aerobic, orange for threshold, and red for maximum. The importance of heart rate in exercise has been stressed in recent years, with many fitness experts emphasizing activities like interval training as most effective in burning fat. “More and more, athletes are recognizing the role that heart rate plays in their training intensity and efficacy, and it has become evident that heart rate is a must-have feature in wearable technology,” said Mio Global CEO Liz Dickinson. What makes the Forerunner 225 different is that it is smart. It suggests days off based on heart rate history. It alerts you when you have been immobile for over an hour and prompts you to move around for a couple of minutes. It even knows how to filter ambient light and detect nuanced changes in the way blood flows through the wrist. It is decently sized, it looks good, and it is waterproof. And what would any device be without a corresponding app? The company’s online community and app Garmin Connect allows the wearer to track, monitor, and store fitness activities, effectively housing all fitness stats in one convenient place. Now we just have to figure out a way to get music and headphone connectivity on there,...

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