5 futuristic baby monitors, from wearable onesies to connected booties
Jun09

5 futuristic baby monitors, from wearable onesies to connected booties

Editor’s Note: In the month of June, we’re focusing on how wearable technology is being used in child-rearing and parenting. Baby monitors, GPS locators, and specialty activity trackers (like UV-ray detectors) are all making their way into the wearable tech space — and each to a different degree of acceptance. We’ll explore what’s useful, what’s to come, and what people think. We have seen wearable technology permeate every industry over the past few years, so it comes as no surprise that a plethora of baby-monitoring devices have found their way into the consumer market. Although wearables’ usefulness as advanced baby monitors is undeniable, the danger of substituting technology for actual parenting is one that comes with the territory. Targeted mostly towards millennials, the following infant wearables could be the future of baby safety for new parents — just as long as they are seen more as peace-of-mind offerings rather than entrusted, catchall devices designed to protect your baby from all danger. Mimo: A wearable onesie One Boston-based startup is seeking to provide new parents with fewer sleepless nights with Mimo, a wearable onesie that tracks your babies’ vitals and relays that information in real-time to your smartphone. The organic cotton “kimono” features two green stripes that behave as respiratory sensors, as well as a detachable turtle clip that monitors skin temperature, breathing pattern, and body position. Mimo offers a level of customization by building individual kits based on age: “We know that every baby is different, and every parent is unique. So why should your baby monitor be built just like everyone else’s?” asks the company. Parents have the option of setting alerts for their babies’ activity, from rolling over to waking up to a change in breathing pattern. The companion app shows the last 10 days of data, allowing parents to discern optimal feeding and bedtimes for the most efficient night of rest. But considering that Mimo is not that different from current baby monitors on the market, who is actually using this product? “Anecdotally, we’ve found that millennial parents like Mimo,” said co-founder Dulcie Madden. “This could be because millennial consumers are more data-driven. Mimo gives them specific data insights about their child’s sleeping behavior.” The Mimo kit currently retails for $199. Owlet: A smart baby bootie Similarly, the Owlet baby sock uses pulse oximetry to non-invasively measure heart rate, oxygen levels, and track skin temp. The hypoallergenic sock also connects to your smartphone via Bluetooth, allowing you to check on your baby constantly and remotely. Owlet markets itself with messaging like, “There is no more stressful tip toeing into baby’s room like a ninja to verify that your baby is ok.” Even so, Owlet also stresses that alerts are...

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