Sony’s crowdfunded Wena smartwatch could be a hit — if it ever gets here
Sep02

Sony’s crowdfunded Wena smartwatch could be a hit — if it ever gets here

Considering the results of a study conducted earlier this year which found “many U.K. consumers would be unwilling to wear any [wearable] products currently on the market” due to their ugly design, it’s no surprise that more and more tech titans are finally beginning to focus on the overall aesthetic of their wearable devices. Increasing the adoption of wearable technology by way of fashionable design is the basis for Sony’s Wena Wrist smartwatch, an acronym which stands for “Wear Electronics Naturally.” Wena is the latest product to come out of Sony’s crowdfunding and e-commerce platform First Flight, a venture that finances experimental projects spearheaded by the company’s employees. The watch is set for release only in Japan and only for iOS, although developers will first have to raise enough funds to bankroll the project within 60 days. In this case, that’s just a cool ¥10 million (~$83,000). Wena’s watch face is that of a traditional timepiece, with three separate hands and dials for hours, minutes, and seconds. Just as a classic analog watch can never truly look outdated, the Wena is designed to remain current thanks to its tech-heavy wriststrap; upgrade the strap, and the entire device will follow suit.  So what are the hardware specs hidden in said strap? An NFC wallet, an activity tracker, and smartphone notifications via LED lights and strap vibration. Details are scarce, but we do know that users will have the ability to take phone calls, check emails, and play games — but at the expense of the device’s week-length battery life (per usual). If Wena is a success in Japan, it could come to the United States, marking another smartwatch hit for Sony alongside the Sony Smartwatch 3. We’ll have to see how the first wave of consumers takes to the watch, if the project is...

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Oculus Rift vs. Project Morpheus: Comparing the hot VR headsets
Aug12

Oculus Rift vs. Project Morpheus: Comparing the hot VR headsets

Remember in the ’90s when virtual reality was supposed to be the gaming of the future? Sega had the VR headset and Nintendo came out with the Virtual boy. Then the unexpected happened: The promise of virtual reality crashed and burned. People hated the clunky tech and crappy graphics. Fast forward to 2015, and we are now sitting on the precipice of a VR throwdown between Oculus Rift and Sony’s Project Morpheus — two of the best gaming headsets of the foreseeable future. We scoured the internet to find as much data as we could on both of these devices, and here’s what we found. Oculus Rift vs. Project Morpheus Design It would seem that the early demise of VR was brought about through the implementation of clunky headwear, but Oculus and Sony have managed to avoid that. Both Oculus’ Rift and Sony’s Project Morpheus boast ergonomic headsets that put comfortability first. Oculus uses a series of straps that are adjustable for each unique user. The company describes the process as similar to putting on a baseball hat. Sony recently redesigned Project Morpheus to only use a single strap with a quick release button, which would be wonderful considering that some people get sick from playing too long. But Oculus one-ups Sony by incorporating an adjuster for the lens on the bottom right side of the headset. Display Both of these products cram so much amazing visual technology into their displays that it could be difficult to decide which one you want. If you want clarity and stunning visuals, then the Rift might be what you’ll consider the best headset for gaming. With final specs putting the resolution at 2160 x 1200, the Oculus Rift uses two OLED lights to produce one image working with 233 million pixels per second. It also packs two AMOLED displays with low-persistence technology. The technology enables incredible visual clarity as you explore virtual worlds with the Rift. Finally, the Oculus Rift has a 100 degree display field, which outperforms the 90 degree display field of Project Morpheus. But what if, for you, clarity isn’t the most important aspect of virtual reality? Recent stats seem to show that Project Morpheus creates a more immersive experience. Morpheus features a 1080p resolution and uses OLED lighting. More importantly, the Sony headset uses LED tracking on all sides of the device. The new prototype has nine tracking LEDS, which is three more than the previous model. This kind of technology would allow you the game to encompass you completely, not just in the 100 degree field for the Oculus Rift. Hardware If you don’t already own a high-end PC, you may want to seriously consider the Sony VR headset. The Oculus Rift...

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