From policing to life-logging, wearable cameras aren’t just for Glassholes
Jul16

From policing to life-logging, wearable cameras aren’t just for Glassholes

Google Glass was hated by the general public for two reasons: First, it’s about as fashionable as dental headgear; second, Glassholes make everyone around them feel uncomfortable — and not just because they look painfully awkward. I’ll never forget the first time I encountered Glass in the wild. It was the start of my workday, I was wearing a wrinkled shirt and purple bags beneath my eyes. The moment I entered the breakroom, I was greeted with, “Hey Mark, smile for the camera.” Like Garfield, I’m not what you would call cheerful before I’ve had my morning cup of coffee. Add the disinterest in being filmed to the mix, and I’m liable to create an HR report of epic proportions. Fortunately, I returned to my desk and cooled off by watching fail videos for the next thirty minutes. Then it hit me like a mountain biker’s front tire to an undetected pothole, a wearable camera can serve many purposes aside from making water-cooler interactions awkward. EXTREME content Thanks to GoPro, the Internet is flushed with first-person footage of death-defying stunts. There are also plenty of less exciting implementations of the technology available for viewing, but even those are worth a laugh. The proliferation of wearable cameras has done wonders for viral entertainment, and devices like Soloshot are pushing the industry even further. With Soloshot, users mount their GoPro (or competing product) to a smart base that follows corresponding Tags worn by the athletes. To put it in layman’s terms, it’s like having a personal cameraman. You simply set up your Soloshot camera base a safe distance from the action, strap the waterproof/shockproof tag somewhere on your person, and go about your business while the Soloshot follows your every move. You can even set it to zoom in or out as you approach the base, as long as you use one of the supported camcorders — most of which are Sony. The Soloshot system also allows you to take photo bursts by tapping the Tag 15, 30, or 45 seconds before you perform your stunt. Soloshot may be the first cameraman replacement to reach the market, but there’s another auspicious wearable hovering in the distance, literally. Nixie is part drone, part smartwatch, and all concept at this point, but the idea was strong enough to win Intel’s Make It Wearable challenge. To sum up their pitch video, Nixie is a drone with a built-in camera that folds around your wrist until you release it into the sky like a trained falcon. The device then films you as you scale a rock face, slackline, or stand awkwardly in a field with one of your closest friends....

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