Using wearables for next-level aid in smoking cessation


Despite there being a variety of ways to kick the habit, cigarette smoking is the cause of one in every five deaths in the United States each year. So what if quitting could be easier and more personalized?

Pharmaceutical company Chrono Therapeutics’ wearable device, the SmartStop, was developed to help those addicted by using programmable, transdermal nicotine replacement therapy. Assuming the Federal Trade Commission approves the SmartStop, Chrono will release the device in 2017.

While nicotine gums and patches can be useful, says CEO of Chrono Alan Levy, Ph.D., “they do not address the cyclical nature of nicotine cravings and offer little to no behavioral support.” That’s precisely where SmartStop flexes its intelligence by adapting to nicotine craving cycles and providing support to its users.

 

 

The SmartStop holds nicotine in replaceable cartridges to provide the stimulant throughout the day. Unlike patches and gum, the SmartStop is programmed to give varying levels of nicotine based on craving cycles.

The device also has Bluetooth to connect to a smartphone app designed to support those going through the process of smoking cessation. It sends notifications to remind and encourage those using the device, as well as provides incentives to stay away from cigarettes. It even provides support networks, which can greatly improve you chances of giving up smoking for good.

Chrono isn’t the only company trying to help others quit the cancerous habit. Kiwi Wearables developed an app called Breath.io that acts as a smoke drag detector and nicotine calculator to help users wane off their nicotine addiction. There is also an Android Wear App called Stop Smoking! for Wear. It keeps track of how long you’ve gone without a cigarette, how many cigarettes you’ve avoided, and how much money you’ve saved.

With wearables, people can quantify their progress and get encouragement to keep going.

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